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VEHICLE OF ESCAPE: news

Connection, catharsis, and transcendence.

jamie marie waelchli
vehicleofescape.com

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I’m developing a performance called Radioactive Momma for Surplus Space in Portland, Oregon. It’s scheduled for Saturday, October 11th. 
Statement: Radioactive Momma is an incongruous rumination that merges apocalyptic fears with the anxieties of becoming a parent. Performer Jamie Marie Waelchli combines excerpts from parenting books, nuclear disaster texts, and the manuals from her infant son’s furniture while physically demonstrating the production of motherhood.

I’m developing a performance called Radioactive Momma for Surplus Space in Portland, Oregon. It’s scheduled for Saturday, October 11th. 

Statement: Radioactive Momma is an incongruous rumination that merges apocalyptic fears with the anxieties of becoming a parent. Performer Jamie Marie Waelchli combines excerpts from parenting books, nuclear disaster texts, and the manuals from her infant son’s furniture while physically demonstrating the production of motherhood.

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Something strange happens after two people live in one body. Sometimes I confuse my own flesh for my son’s. I look down at my navel and expect to see the umbilical chord stump still crumbing off. 
You are hyperaware of firsts. The first time you walk across the street as a non-pregnant woman. The first time you listen to music as a parent. The first time your breasts leak in public. The first time you wake up not in shock. The first time you sleep for more than one hour successively. The first time you dream in your sleep. The first time your son is your son in a dream. The first time each person you used to know identifies you as a mother.  Something strange happens after two people live in one body. Sometimes I confuse my own flesh for my son’s. I look down at my navel and expect to see the umbilical chord stump still crumbing off. 
You are hyperaware of firsts. The first time you walk across the street as a non-pregnant woman. The first time you listen to music as a parent. The first time your breasts leak in public. The first time you wake up not in shock. The first time you sleep for more than one hour successively. The first time you dream in your sleep. The first time your son is your son in a dream. The first time each person you used to know identifies you as a mother. 

Something strange happens after two people live in one body. Sometimes I confuse my own flesh for my son’s. I look down at my navel and expect to see the umbilical chord stump still crumbing off. 

You are hyperaware of firsts. The first time you walk across the street as a non-pregnant woman. The first time you listen to music as a parent. The first time your breasts leak in public. The first time you wake up not in shock. The first time you sleep for more than one hour successively. The first time you dream in your sleep. The first time your son is your son in a dream. The first time each person you used to know identifies you as a mother. 

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I’m looking forward to showing off the best work my students created throughout the two years I’ve taught time-based art at Clark College. We’re also featuring a selection works by Clark’s video and web production students and by other students of our region including PNCA, PSU, NWFilm, WSU. Check it all out at Kiggins beautiful historic theatre in downtown Vancouver. Completely free and open to the public. It would be great to see you there!

I’m looking forward to showing off the best work my students created throughout the two years I’ve taught time-based art at Clark College. We’re also featuring a selection works by Clark’s video and web production students and by other students of our region including PNCA, PSU, NWFilm, WSU. Check it all out at Kiggins beautiful historic theatre in downtown Vancouver. 

Completely free and open to the public. It would be great to see you there!

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As seen while riding Amtrack to my baby shower.

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Yesterday I celebrated my seven year anniversary of moving to Portland. For a long time since that first day, I got stuck in a deep rut and it felt like nothing significant in my life would change. Then all the sudden everything changed. Back in 2012 I abruptly, finally had the opportunity to accept my dream job as a college art instructor. At the time I was an adjunct but within the year I was hired to try out a temporary, full-time teaching position (now ending in four weeks). Shortly prior I’d gotten engaged and then married in 2013. Soon after that I got pregnant.
I know how fortunate I am to live at a time where becoming a mom is something I’ve been able to do only after feeling ready to do it, and while I certainly have  aprehensions about all this I can say from a very deep place that I am really ready. 
At the same time I also have to admit that I didn’t know how hard it would be to continue to make my work while coping with pregnancy stuff and also teaching full time. The stuff I have made is probably too personal/self-indulgent to stand as work. I hope things will turn around once the baby is born, but pretty much any parent I talk to scoughs at the likelihood of that happening. Still I believe it will. 
I haven’t said much about this pregnancy to anyone other than my husband, my doctor, or my mom. That’s partially because I’m damn introverted, but it’s also because my closest friends and the people I most identify with tend to not have kids so now there’s sort of a growing chasm between us. Also, I used to feel SO WEIRD (albeit in a fascinated way) when people I knew had kids and wouldn’t talk about anything else, so I’ve tried to purposefully talk about everything else but this baby when I’m with people or communicating via social media. But honestly I’m thinking about the baby ALL THE TIME so that leaves me very quiet. Like this blog, I haven’t had much to say here in quite a while. At least now, maybe you know why.  Yesterday I celebrated my seven year anniversary of moving to Portland. For a long time since that first day, I got stuck in a deep rut and it felt like nothing significant in my life would change. Then all the sudden everything changed. Back in 2012 I abruptly, finally had the opportunity to accept my dream job as a college art instructor. At the time I was an adjunct but within the year I was hired to try out a temporary, full-time teaching position (now ending in four weeks). Shortly prior I’d gotten engaged and then married in 2013. Soon after that I got pregnant.
I know how fortunate I am to live at a time where becoming a mom is something I’ve been able to do only after feeling ready to do it, and while I certainly have  aprehensions about all this I can say from a very deep place that I am really ready. 
At the same time I also have to admit that I didn’t know how hard it would be to continue to make my work while coping with pregnancy stuff and also teaching full time. The stuff I have made is probably too personal/self-indulgent to stand as work. I hope things will turn around once the baby is born, but pretty much any parent I talk to scoughs at the likelihood of that happening. Still I believe it will. 
I haven’t said much about this pregnancy to anyone other than my husband, my doctor, or my mom. That’s partially because I’m damn introverted, but it’s also because my closest friends and the people I most identify with tend to not have kids so now there’s sort of a growing chasm between us. Also, I used to feel SO WEIRD (albeit in a fascinated way) when people I knew had kids and wouldn’t talk about anything else, so I’ve tried to purposefully talk about everything else but this baby when I’m with people or communicating via social media. But honestly I’m thinking about the baby ALL THE TIME so that leaves me very quiet. Like this blog, I haven’t had much to say here in quite a while. At least now, maybe you know why. 

Yesterday I celebrated my seven year anniversary of moving to Portland. For a long time since that first day, I got stuck in a deep rut and it felt like nothing significant in my life would change. Then all the sudden everything changed. Back in 2012 I abruptly, finally had the opportunity to accept my dream job as a college art instructor. At the time I was an adjunct but within the year I was hired to try out a temporary, full-time teaching position (now ending in four weeks). Shortly prior I’d gotten engaged and then married in 2013. Soon after that I got pregnant.

I know how fortunate I am to live at a time where becoming a mom is something I’ve been able to do only after feeling ready to do it, and while I certainly have  aprehensions about all this I can say from a very deep place that I am really ready. 

At the same time I also have to admit that I didn’t know how hard it would be to continue to make my work while coping with pregnancy stuff and also teaching full time. The stuff I have made is probably too personal/self-indulgent to stand as work. I hope things will turn around once the baby is born, but pretty much any parent I talk to scoughs at the likelihood of that happening. Still I believe it will. 

I haven’t said much about this pregnancy to anyone other than my husband, my doctor, or my mom. That’s partially because I’m damn introverted, but it’s also because my closest friends and the people I most identify with tend to not have kids so now there’s sort of a growing chasm between us. Also, I used to feel SO WEIRD (albeit in a fascinated way) when people I knew had kids and wouldn’t talk about anything else, so I’ve tried to purposefully talk about everything else but this baby when I’m with people or communicating via social media. But honestly I’m thinking about the baby ALL THE TIME so that leaves me very quiet. Like this blog, I haven’t had much to say here in quite a while. At least now, maybe you know why. 

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Solid Mind - Showing at Place A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli
Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 
Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pmSecond Reception - February 16th 5-9pmArtist Talk - February 24th at 2pm
PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 
Solid Mind - Showing at Place A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli
Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 
Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pmSecond Reception - February 16th 5-9pmArtist Talk - February 24th at 2pm
PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 
Solid Mind - Showing at Place A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli
Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 
Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pmSecond Reception - February 16th 5-9pmArtist Talk - February 24th at 2pm
PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 
Solid Mind - Showing at Place A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli
Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 
Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pmSecond Reception - February 16th 5-9pmArtist Talk - February 24th at 2pm
PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 
Solid Mind - Showing at Place A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli
Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 
Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pmSecond Reception - February 16th 5-9pmArtist Talk - February 24th at 2pm
PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 
Solid Mind - Showing at Place A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli
Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 
Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pmSecond Reception - February 16th 5-9pmArtist Talk - February 24th at 2pm
PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 

Solid Mind - Showing at Place 
A drawing installation by Jamie Marie Waelchli

Solid Mind examines the disappointments and frustrations, internal and external, that interfere with one’s goals, ideals, and anticipated life trajectory. The installation considers the reconciliation of personal expectations with lived reality using glass containers, liquid, light, and a stream-of-conscious drawing technique. Translucent vessels occupied with mixtures of oil, water, and ink suggest the tensions and frustrations of wanting and needing, and the subsequent anxieties of having, holding, and keeping. 

Hours: Thursday - Sunday, 12:00-6:00 PM 
Opening Reception - January 19th 5-9pm
Second Reception - February 16th 5-9pm
Artist Talk - February 24th at 2pm

PLACE is a gallery space on the third floor of the Pioneer Place Mall (Atrium Bldg) in downtown Portland, OR. 

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Working on some experiments with glass, oil, ink and vellum. 

Working on some experiments with glass, oil, ink and vellum. 

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A recording of the performance Little Pleasures, will be screened this month in two places:
At Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design as part of Attribute (v./n.) curated by Tanya Dhein
And at Boom Bap throughout this month in Portland, Oregon. (Reception 5:30pm until 10:30pm on Friday, October 5th)
I made this video five years ago (feels like 50) during grad school and it’s gone on to be more widely screened than any other video I’ve made. It’s also gotten more publicity and personal response than anything I’ve done before or since. This makes me sometimes terrified that my best work is behind me. (And it involved me slobbering) But I have to say I’m extremely grateful that the piece has meant something to people. It was cathartic to do, it come from a very real place, it gave me a way to express struggles I didn’t have the words to admit. When I watch it now I feel disconnected from this younger version of myself, and so I see it very differently than I used to. At any rate, here are a few images from the first time I performed Little Pleasures. (My professors (reluctantly) asked me to do it again because the background looked so distracting that first time. A recording of the performance Little Pleasures, will be screened this month in two places:
At Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design as part of Attribute (v./n.) curated by Tanya Dhein
And at Boom Bap throughout this month in Portland, Oregon. (Reception 5:30pm until 10:30pm on Friday, October 5th)
I made this video five years ago (feels like 50) during grad school and it’s gone on to be more widely screened than any other video I’ve made. It’s also gotten more publicity and personal response than anything I’ve done before or since. This makes me sometimes terrified that my best work is behind me. (And it involved me slobbering) But I have to say I’m extremely grateful that the piece has meant something to people. It was cathartic to do, it come from a very real place, it gave me a way to express struggles I didn’t have the words to admit. When I watch it now I feel disconnected from this younger version of myself, and so I see it very differently than I used to. At any rate, here are a few images from the first time I performed Little Pleasures. (My professors (reluctantly) asked me to do it again because the background looked so distracting that first time. A recording of the performance Little Pleasures, will be screened this month in two places:
At Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design as part of Attribute (v./n.) curated by Tanya Dhein
And at Boom Bap throughout this month in Portland, Oregon. (Reception 5:30pm until 10:30pm on Friday, October 5th)
I made this video five years ago (feels like 50) during grad school and it’s gone on to be more widely screened than any other video I’ve made. It’s also gotten more publicity and personal response than anything I’ve done before or since. This makes me sometimes terrified that my best work is behind me. (And it involved me slobbering) But I have to say I’m extremely grateful that the piece has meant something to people. It was cathartic to do, it come from a very real place, it gave me a way to express struggles I didn’t have the words to admit. When I watch it now I feel disconnected from this younger version of myself, and so I see it very differently than I used to. At any rate, here are a few images from the first time I performed Little Pleasures. (My professors (reluctantly) asked me to do it again because the background looked so distracting that first time.

A recording of the performance Little Pleasures, will be screened this month in two places:

At Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design as part of Attribute (v./n.) curated by Tanya Dhein

And at Boom Bap throughout this month in Portland, Oregon. (Reception 5:30pm until 10:30pm on Friday, October 5th)

I made this video five years ago (feels like 50) during grad school and it’s gone on to be more widely screened than any other video I’ve made. It’s also gotten more publicity and personal response than anything I’ve done before or since. This makes me sometimes terrified that my best work is behind me. (And it involved me slobbering) But I have to say I’m extremely grateful that the piece has meant something to people. It was cathartic to do, it come from a very real place, it gave me a way to express struggles I didn’t have the words to admit. When I watch it now I feel disconnected from this younger version of myself, and so I see it very differently than I used to. At any rate, here are a few images from the first time I performed Little Pleasures. (My professors (reluctantly) asked me to do it again because the background looked so distracting that first time.

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I love teaching, so I’m beyond thrilled that Clark College offered me a summer digital photography class. This is an extreme honor. College was crazy with meaning, completely opened my world. I can’t express the gratitude I have for my professors. So now I need to make sure I to do right by my own students. I’m working on our syllabus and first presentation right now. And there’s A LOT more to do after the class starts… so if you don’t see me around for a few weeks, thats why.

I love teaching, so I’m beyond thrilled that Clark College offered me a summer digital photography class. This is an extreme honor. College was crazy with meaning, completely opened my world. I can’t express the gratitude I have for my professors. So now I need to make sure I to do right by my own students. I’m working on our syllabus and first presentation right now. And there’s A LOT more to do after the class starts… so if you don’t see me around for a few weeks, thats why.

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I’m finishing up on my work for the RACC development grant; the business cards are in final draft, the new site is almost there, and I’ve got two hardcover photo book portfolios nearly ready to be ordered. Feels good. 

I’m finishing up on my work for the RACC development grant; the business cards are in final draft, the new site is almost there, and I’ve got two hardcover photo book portfolios nearly ready to be ordered. Feels good.